Senate District 11
Teresa Fedor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fedor, Manning Reintroduce Legislation to Provide Testing and Graduation Flexibility
February 4, 2021

This week, state Senators Teresa Fedor (D-Toledo) and Nathan Manning (R-North Ridgeville) introduced a bill to address end-of-course examinations, K-12 standardized testing requirements and provide graduation flexibility for high school seniors through the 2020-2021 school year.


“It has been questioned whether or not standardized tests truly provide an accurate measure of a student’s ability,” Fedor said. “Additionally, this pandemic has put all students under an immeasurable amount of stress, even students who have been able to return to in-person instruction. No student should be held back or prevented from graduating because of it. Teachers have been able to rise to countless challenges related to the pandemic and it's time we trust them to provide a more accurate assessment of their students’ success.” 


Senate Bill 37 would extend students’ ability to use course grades instead of end-of-course exams to qualify for graduation. It would also give teachers, principals and counselors the ability to determine students’ graduation eligibility if they don’t already meet the state graduation requirements for the 2020-2021 school year.


“Proactively passing this legislation will help enable our schools to focus on what is most important, which is the safety and education of our children,” said Manning.  


The bill would also allow the state to waive state tests that are not federally required and provide a process by which the State Superintendent can consider and accept a waiver for federal tests for the 2020-2021 school year. Finally, it would maintain schools’ requirement to administer the ACT and SAT to allow students the option to take these exams.


S.B. 37 includes provisions from S.B. 258, which Fedor and Manning introduced in the past General Assembly.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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